Saturday, November 3, 2007

Scribe for November 2nd

Hey there again,
-Today we started class off by Collecting our locker tags that we did with our groups
- Next we turned in our big purple books so make sure to get that in so you don't have to carry it around.
- We also read Act 1 scene 1 and scene 2 in Hamlet so make sure to get caught up on that.
- Were starting a new thing where we posts questions on the Scribe blog for the day.
- Make sure your signed up for a day to present AND discuss during the fishbowls.
- The Hw. is to work on your semester project with your group, plan for the days you are either a discusser or a presenter during the fishbowl.
- That about does it for todays scribe have a good weekend everyone.

15 comments:

brooksk said...

Since nobody really spoke up in class about it on Friday I figured if I post it here more would be willing to speak up...

What are some examples of symbolism that you found in the first two scenes of Act I? How do you think these examples will impact the outcome or how will they become a factor later on in the play? Also, what suspicions do you have about the re-appearing ghost and how can the elements of the ghost apply to the Medieval ages and culture during this time era?

Brooks

Leigh J said...

I think it is interesting that the ghost only comes out at night. Also, the ghost seems sort of angry and I am curious to know why he won't talk. I wonder why he would appear but not say anything. I don't know what his intentions are.

Emily H. said...

I think it's really interesting to see the emotions that Hamlet feels expressed so eloquently through the words of shakespeare. I also think its interesting that the ghost only comes out at night. I am hoping to learn more about Hamlet's father and what the ghost represents.

brooksk said...

I read on through the rest of Act I and what you guys will find about the ghost's desire is very interesting. Before reading to this part I saw Old Hamlet as probably being a very noble and righteous king who was sincere and a strong leader. But, after reading about what the ghost wants, my attitude altered to the idea that oh, this ghost is vengeful and actually is not very sincere towards others. Does this take away his nobility or leadership, most likely not, but it struck me in a peculiar way to read about the ghost's desires for Hamlet.

Also, what did you guys think of the movie clips today? Which clip did you find the "best version" or "most applicable version" and what is your reasoning for this choice? Although I found Mel Gibson's version to be a more classical and applicable version to Shakespeare's play, I though that the modernized version showed the most symbolism and emotion through the acting, colors, palace decor, etc. I think that from this episode we would have more literary elements to extract and analyze.

sook said...

Well, although the king was supposed to be a strong and good leader, it doesn't surprise me that the ghost was vengeful. It is wrong to ask Hamlet for his revenge, but the king lost everything because of Claudius. He has every right to have revenge. The king lost his life, throne and wife.
Out of all the movies, I like the Kenneth Branagh version the best. I guess the actor that plays Hamlet shows his emotions more than the others, and there is more symbolism that can be found.
What I was confused about was the scene after the ghost speaks to Hamlet. If the other guards followed Hamlet, wouldn't they have seen the ghost?

emilyl said...

(Don’t read if you haven’t finished scenes 1-5)
The suspicion everyone has for each other makes me suspicious of everyone. I already disliked Claudius, but now I really do think he had something to do with Old Hamlet's death. Laertes is warning Ophelia about Hamlet, so I wonder if she will listen to his advice or not. Polonius is even more aggressive in his warnings because of his reputation, and because Hamlet can not marry Ophelia. Claudius is proving to be a horrible king with his parties and incestuous actions, and Hamlet hates him more and more. (I just finished through 5)I knew that Claudius was bad! It is sad that Hamlet’s mother was also committing adultery, so I wonder if Hamlet is going to do something to her anyways, even though Old Hamlet said not to. Suspicious of the ghost as well, Marcellus and Horatio ignore Hamlet’s instructions not to follow, and they never did swear on Hamlet’s sword, so are they going to say something? Killing Claudius is not only for revenge, it is also so that Denmark can be clean of the lust, adultery and partying that Claudius has brought to it, and getting rid of these might help in the war against Young Fortinbras. Hamlet is definitely a tragic hero because he is now completely fixed on avenging his father, basically blinded, (Hamlet wipes away all trivial records so that “thy commandment all alone shall live) so this will most likely lead him to trouble. I wonder if Ophelia will be important to Hamlet still, since he is focused on revenge, and this will either make her more desperate for Hamlet or save her from embarrassing herself.

Kyle B. said...

It might just be me, in fact, it is most likely just me, but did anyone else think that King Claudius may only be acting in the interest of Denmark? That he didn't marry solely for personal gain? That maybe he felt that he, as a strong individual, should take the throne to maintain Denmark's strong image so as to fend off Young Fortinbras? I do think that there was some level of personal gain involved, but maybe he felt that the outcome should benefit the kingdom. Does anyone think that there is a stronger bond between Laertes and Claudius than is revealed? When the king is speaking to Laertes, he makes it seems as though any request that Laertes makes of him, he would do anything to grant it. But, even though he makes sure to reinforce his image as Hamlet's new father, he makes no effort to make himself or anything expressly available to Hamlet. Is there a conspiracy afoot? Hmmm...

Kyle B. said...

It might just be me, in fact, it is most likely just me, but did anyone else think that King Claudius may only be acting in the interest of Denmark? That he didn't marry solely for personal gain? That maybe he felt that he, as a strong individual, should take the throne to maintain Denmark's strong image so as to fend off Young Fortinbras? I do think that there was some level of personal gain involved, but maybe he felt that the outcome should benefit the kingdom. Does anyone think that there is a stronger bond between Laertes and Claudius than is revealed? When the king is speaking to Laertes, he makes it seems as though any request that Laertes makes of him, he would do anything to grant it. But, even though he makes sure to reinforce his image as Hamlet's new father, he makes no effort to make himself or anything expressly available to Hamlet. Is there a conspiracy afoot? Hmmm...

Kyle B. said...

Oops, didn't mean to post that twice.

Kyle B. said...

Oops, didn't mean to post that twice.

Kyle B. said...

Oops, didn't mean to post that twice.

Kyle B. said...

I should just stop, geez

brooksk said...

Kyle, I think that is a great observation and it makes me wonder also... Are we going to see a conflict between Hamlet and Laertes in the future? Will this conflict be sparked by Claudius in an interest to ravage Denmark in a power-hungry adventure? I am very anxious to read on and to see whether a conflict ignites between the two for the future throne or not...

The only part I do disagree with Kyle on is the suggestion that Claudius did this in an interest for Denmark...In my eyes he did this on a hunt for power and will morph the image for Denmark's people.

JoeR said...

I am going to make a prediction-
I think that there is going to be a major conflict surrounding Claudius and Hamlet. I think Hamlet is going to find out something about Claudius that sends him over the edge. We are too early into the play to learn exactly what that is, but I have a feeling that this may happen.

Just something to think about.

brooksk said...

Joe, if you were to complete the assignment and read through scene 5 you would see that Hamlet learns from King Hamlet's spirit that he was murdered by Claudius and is instructed to get revenge...as we saw in the videos today. Read further and you will see.